Nancy Gibson – she loves wildlife

LWL-LOGO-SSHOT-300x99

I have had the pleasure to work with Nancy Gibson, the founder of Love Wildlife Thailand, for a number of years.  This is a lady who is passionate about conservation and especially the welfare of our animal relatives.  Nancy does a great amount of work through education and working with schools and is always willing to visit and partner young people through environment based projects.  She is also an inspiring speaker and can engage large audiences as a key note or even spend the day working with children (and staff) of all ages as a facilitator.  If you are in the South East Asia region and are looking for a way to target your sustainable thinking and action Identity then get in contact with Nancy and the Love Wildlife team – they really do love wildlife!

Why did you start Love Wildlife Thailand?

Nancy: Wildlife was a passion of mine since I ended my pursuit to become a medical doctor in university. I had always been surrounded by animals my whole life and realised late in my undergrad that I wanted to work in wildlife. I did wildlife education for some time in the states and had the opportunity to get experience here in Thailand before going back to start my own “something related to wildlife” in the US. I had actually thought of the name before I moved to Thailand, but didn’t know what I really wanted to do with it at that point.

As I gained experience here working with wildlife vets I realised that Thailand needed more programs for wildlife education, far more than the US could ever need and decided to stay here and start my NGO.

YEN2

In what ways are you a global citizen?

Nancy: I have demonstrated being a global citizen by first and foremost, taking responsibility for my own actions and how I treat nature and the environment. Secondly, I would say that I continue to pass on the torch to the younger generation through the education programs I develop and through inspiring kids to do more. The Youth Ecological Network is an example of that, were I am creating an environment for students to take charge and own the programs within their schools and reach out to their communities to spread awareness and take action.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Why do you think sustainable thinking and action is important in today’s schools?

Nancy: With the rapid deterioration of the environment and overuse from generations before (and even now), it’s definitely important to think sustainable in today’s schools. When we teach student’s to be responsible and make it a habit within the schools, student’s will often carry it on to their homes. This will in turn create a more sustainable future for generations to come. If we do not teach these things, our world will not be a very good place not too far in the future.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

How can schools and individuals work with and support Love Wildlife?

Nancy: Of course Love Wildlife always needs funding to survive and continue to provide programs that not only teach about the environment and wildlife, but also support the conservation efforts as well. Holding events to provide knowledge and outreach to the local communities are always a great thing to do. Many schools have jumped in on programs that they feel match their ideals or interests and have volunteered time to work on certain issues such as shark fin campaigns, dolphin issues and illegal wildlife trade. Supporting our new after school education program from grades 1-4 would (YEN Kids) also help in the sustainability of the organisation as well as give your students fun and interactive ways to learn about the many issues in wildlife.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Nancy: Love Wildlife not only works hard at educating young students about wildlife, but push forward building a better future for wildlife in Thailand. We work closely with the Thai government in capacity building and improving the lives of captive animals.

Thanks to Nancy for contributing to the Global Citizenship Award website and sharing her thoughts.  Please do check out the Love Wildlife website and get involved, there is plenty to do!

See also Anita’s experience working with Nancy and the Love Wildlife team.

Advertisements

Chipseng Thor – a man all about community partnerships

Chipseng with his wife Char by the Seuang River

Chipseng with his wife Char by the Seuang River

Last week I had the pleasure to spend three days with an amazing man and good friend who lives in Laos.  I was fortunate to meet Chipseng in early 2011 through a mutual friend of ours on a community project in Laos (one of the best service projects that I have experienced).  After observing Chipseng passionately lead the project and masterfully connect the visiting group and the local community he knows so well together I decided to invite him to Thailand later that year to experience an international school setting and to allow as many of our students and staff to learn from Chipseng as I had done.  It was great to be able to get the chance to take my family to Luang Prabang in northern Laos and to meet Chipseng and his family and to find out a lot more about what makes this man such an inspiring community leader and developer of educational partnerships.

The mountain along Seuang River where Chipseng was born

The mountain along Seuang River where Chipseng was born

Chipseng was born north east of Luang Prabang in the countryside along the Seuang River that flows into the Mekong.  He is Hmong, people that traditionally live in the highest mountain areas of Laos and other parts of South East Asia. He moved to Luang Prabang when he was only 7 years old to study because, as he told me, he had the ‘authority’ then to leave his family, even though he was the youngest son and was expected to stay in the village and look after the family.  At that time there were no roads and he had to trek and take a boat along the river for two days to get to Luang Prabang.

At that time Chipseng could only speak Hmong. He had to learn the Laos language when he got to school and spent 8 years studying and living at the government school in Luang Prabang. The school was started to give children from the rural areas an opportunity of an education.  He then attended high school for three years and met Chan, his wife. They married after high school and Chipseng’s parents came to live with them in Luang Prabang. He wanted to go to university but had to support the family and joined the Laos Army instead for 3 years. During his time in the army he felt there was a lack of opportunity to develop himself and to also support the community so he left the army and went to teacher training college and studied English for 3 years whilst working freelance as a tour guide. He joined Educational Travel Asia 4 years ago after meeting Graham Harper* on a project. Chipseng is now the project manager for ETA Laos.

*Soon to be be featured under speakers

Chipseng with the Headteachers of Pak Xeng School in a typical classroom

Chipseng with the Headteachers of Pak Xeng School in a typical classroom

Chipseng really loves his job and you can see it.  He knows everyone and he has their full trust and loyalty.  He is one of those unique people that can connect and bring people together to create mutually beneficial learning outcomes and sustainable partnerships.  He repeatedly tells me that he is happy that through his work he has a good opportunity to help and support the local people and his community. He believes it is important to develop international understanding amongst the Laos people but also tourists and international students that visit Laos.

Chipseng is passionate about the partnership of education and tourism and the symbiotic role they should have on one another. He uses a teacher who has not travelled as an example and  questions how that person can impart knowledge and understanding effectively without understanding other people and cultures.  He wants this for the Laos teachers and is working closely with Graham Harper and ETA to ensure that the communities and the schools along Seuang River benefit directly and in a sustainable manner from the increase in tourism and also from international educational partnerships.  A number of international schools and universities already work with Chipseng and visit Seuang River on an annual basis.

Pak Xeng School classroom

Pak Xeng School classroom

Chipseng took my family and I to Pak Xeng, a village about 3 hours from Luang Prabang.  We were honoured to have been hosted by a home-stay family (something every international student and educator should experience) and visited the primary and secondary school.  We met the students, the teachers and also the headteachers and shared a number of facts about our own schools and experiences.  One standout fact is that Pak Xeng Secondary School has 60 – 70 students per class.  You could tell the teachers work very hard and do their very best for the students and never complain. Chipseng and the headteachers showed me around some of the classrooms and explained that the next project is to improve the roof (which was falling down) and to replace the broken desks and benches (see photos).  I said to them that these classrooms were obviously not being used at present and they quickly replied that there were and that there was nowhere else to teach the students.

The roof above the classrooms

The roof above the classrooms

Chipseng and ETA are looking for educational partners to support the Pak Xeng School project.  The approximate cost to replace the roof and to improve the classrooms is $12,000.  If you think your university, your school, your social group, your family or yourself as an individual would like to support this project and/or visit Seuang River as part of a service learning community project then please do contact Chipseng or Graham below:

chipseng@buffalotours.com

graham@buffalotours.com

I highly recommend Seuang River as a place to visit and a community to connect with and there is no better person to do that through than with Chipseng Thor.

Just Can’t Get Enough of the Thai Tims?

The Thai Tims

The Thai Tims

The Thai Tims are a group of enthusiastic and inspirational young Thai students that attend a very special school in Chantaburi, in the east of Thailand.  This is the only Thai school that takes in children who have down-syndrome and allows them to have an inclusive and normal education, just like every other child.   The Thai Tims are made up of children who attend the school and they learn English through fun games, activities, sports and mostly through learning Celtic themed songs taught by Pun and Paul Lennon, the founders of the Thai Tims and the Good Child Foundation.  The idea being that the support the Thai Tims receive locally and internationally (and there is a lot of it!) allows the school to provide the necessary resources to take in Thai children with down-syndrome.

Pun Lennon with the Thai Tims at their school

Pun Lennon with the Thai Tims at their school

Watch this video if you Just can’t get enough of the Thai Tims!

The Thai Tims have quickly established a cult following, especially on social media and among football fans that traditionally follow Celtic Football Club and anything linked to their history and tradition.  Celtic Football Club and their fans have been a huge supporter of the Thai Tims and continue to have a strong community partnership.

Pun teaching the Thai Tims one of their Celtic themed songs

Pun teaching the Thai Tims one of their Celtic themed songs

Pun and Paul have a remarkable story to tell about the Thai Tims and a book will soon be available, written by Paul, that recounts their own personal story and the success and achievements of the Thai Tims.  You can find out more by visiting the Good Child Foundation website or the Thai Tims Facebook, both are below:

Good Child Foundation

Follow the Thai Tims on Facebook.

Gappies with some of the children supported by the Thai Tims

Gappies with some of the children supported by the Thai Tims

The Thai Tims are full of energy – just check out their YouTube clips there are plenty of them.  They also do a lot of travelling not just in Thailand but also overseas.  They have recently visited Scotland to meet the Celtic football team and to also sing before a Scottish Premiership game.  They also love swimming and always enjoy visiting the Regents International School Pattaya and staying overnight which includes a long session of night-swimming!  It has always added an extra cultural and inspiring dimension when events such as International Day, Clean-up the World and Picnic in the Park have involved the Thai Tims as special guests.  I would like to thank Karen Partyka for making the initial connection and believing that the two school groups could work and learn together.

Below is a short article written by Conor Hannigan about his visit to the Thai Tims in 2013, a previous gappie and passionate Celtic FC fan:

Visiting the Thai Tims

On Monday, June 24th, a group of Gap Staff accompanied Mr. Crouch, Khun Da, and Mr. Jones on a visit to the Triamsuksa School in Chantaburi province; home of The Good Child Foundation and the Thai Tims. Khun Da and Mr. Jones were on a mission to set up a possible Outdoor Education activity with the kids from the school, while Mr. Crouch wanted to touch base and strengthen bonds with an already closely knit community partner. For us Gap Staff, it was an opportunity to visit a community partner in rural Thailand and hear the incredibly inspiring story behind the Thai Tims.

Triamsuksa School is one of the only in Thailand which allows children with down syndrome to integrate into a mainstream education system. Normally they are sent to an institution or essentially exiled from Thai education, and from parts of society.

When Mr. Lennon’s first son, Berni, was born with down syndrome, he and his wife Pun worried for Berni’s education. They offered to teach English for free at Triamsuksa School if Berni was offered a place, under the condition that they were allowed to teach the kids football songs.

As a result of these songs, the Thai Tims have a deep connection with Glasgow Celtic Football Club. Mr. Lennon is a Celtic fan, and he has written dozens, perhaps hundreds of songs about the club and its players that the kids sing together to help raise funds for The Good Child Foundation. They are a very famous group of kids, not just among Celtic fans in Scotland and Thailand, but around the world.

Conor with Pun at the Thai Tims

Conor with Pun at the Thai Tims

Throughout the day we were able to look inside the newly constructed Reamonn Gormley Memorial Hall; the strikingly bold centerpiece of the school’s buildings. We also met Nuey and Nook, two of the younger children in the school with down syndrome and Mr. Crouch enjoyed a lovely tea party with them. We were told about the recent trip to Scotland where 47 kids from the school were taken to meet the Celtic players, and sing at one of the games. Mr. Lennon explained that the criterion for selection for this trip was based upon an act of bravery which seemed fitting, as bravery appeared to be a quality which resonated through every aspect of the school.

It was incredible to see the passion emanating from Mr. Lennon as he talked about children with down syndrome and the Thai Tims, and it was clear that Pun’s same passion, as well as her reassurance and support of her husband was just as strong.

After visiting a few classrooms and hearing the kids sing some of their Celtic songs, Mr. Crouch, Khun Da, and Mr. Jones did some final planning with regards to activities for next year between Regent’s and the Thai Tims. We left for Regent’s in the afternoon, feeling inspired, impressed and lucky to have gotten a glimpse of all the things the Lennon family has done for Triamsuksa School, and for down syndrome children in Thailand.

 

Khun Nui – ‘I have a disability but I am not disabled’

A disabled body becomes an obstacle,

If broken limbs defeat your heart,

But love does not come from outward appearances,

It comes from the hope we nurture inside.

                                                                       Miss Thanaree (Nui) Fungpinyopap

Nui speaking at the We Walk Together conference in 2010

Nui speaking at the We Walk Together conference in 2010

Khun Nui has an inspiring story and she is an amazing person.  This is a lady that you must meet and invite into your school or organisation.  Ask her to tell her story and give her own thoughts about education and personal challenge to your students and colleagues.  Then let your team spend time with her and enjoy her company for the day – she likes to eat lunch!

In 2010 Khun Nui was one of many speakers at the Round Square International Conference – she had never spoken publicly before but had worked with the Regent’s students and staff for a couple of years through the community partner learning programme.  When it came to speaking in front of 850 people, 77 schools from all over the world and a royal family there may have been a bit of apprehension on her part!  On the day she really delivered – speaking from the heart and with emotion – there was not a dry eye in the audience.  Khun Nui also received the longest standing ovation of the whole conference.  Since then Khun Nui has spoken a number of times and always focused on her powerful message “that having a disability does not mean you are disabled,” something we can all reflect upon and think about when we find something challenging, difficult or even frustrating.  Below is an account of Khun Nui’s story.  You can also find Khun Nui via Facebook.

Khun Nui with the We Walk Together team at the Father Ray Foundation

Khun Nui with the We Walk Together team at the Father Ray Foundation

A Miraculous Child

My Story – by Miss Thanaree Fungpinyopap

When my father Thanakorn first laid eyes on me he was quite shocked; I was born without my arms and legs. Thankfully my father was a strong man and he promised in his heart to love me despite my disabilities. My mother however struggled to accept me for who I was. My mother’s family also felt my disabilities would bring great shame down on their decent name. They cruelly persuaded her to abandon me and my father.

My mother left our home as I neared my first birthday. I would learn later that she found a new husband and immigrated to Australia. My father now had to assume the role of both father and mother. This was an immense task for him to undertake; especially in those early years. He worked tirelessly to make sure I always had food to eat and clothes to wear. Despite the difficulties my disabilities presented he was always patient and loving with me. He often reminded himself that he was blessed with both arms and legs, whereas I, his daughter, was not. My father was also very protective of me and had little patience for those who looked down on me.

My father knew he couldn’t take care of me all his life. He understood how important it was to teach me how to become independent, confident and happy, so that one day I could take care of myself. Thankfully many of my father’s friends also offered their support. Then Tim, my first nanny, came into my life. Tim became like a surrogate mother to me. My father often took me out of the house and brought me around the town and countryside. People looked at me strangely. They turned their heads and stared as we walked by. But my father was defiant and proud to be with me. He helped teach me as a child not to feel shame for who I was. He always told me that ‘you are disabled in body, but people who mistreat you are disabled in the heart. You should be proud in everything you have; you are entirely able as long as your spirit is strong in your heart.’

When I was seven years old my father hired tutors to come to my home. This would be my first step on the road to education. I really enjoyed studying and I amazed everyone with my beautiful handwriting. I also loved to research books and learn more about general knowledge. I was delighted when I finished primary education; it was my first great achievement. As I neared the end of senior high school I learned of the Tongku School for adult education. This school allowed for its students to study and work at the same time. I applied and was accepted there. I studied here between the ages of eighteen and twenty. The principal of the school, Komkrit Junkajon, was exceptionally kind and helped me a great deal. One day he came to visit me at home. He confessed to be that he found me an inspirational person who gave him great strength to fight many of the problems in his own life. He said I was a miraculous child. He said the world would be a better place if everyone had my positive outlook on life.

My father got remarried. Soon I had two young brothers to play with. Unfortunately this meant the expense on our household increased and my father’s business, a car repair shop, struggled more and more. As our debt mounted my father and step-mother argued often. The stress led to my father suffering a brain hemorrhage and he passed away. This was a terrible tragedy for me. Sadness overwhelmed me. I wished I could have followed my father on his journey and not remain here all alone.

I didn’t think I could live without him.

His death led to further problems with my step-mom. She couldn’t handle the stress of maintaining the household and she put the blame on me. There was no love left for me in the house and I knew I had to leave. At first I had nowhere to go. My real mother was now living in Australia for over twenty years and I learned that she still couldn’t accept me and my disabilities, even after all this time. But then a former customer of my father’s shop, Daorung, who ran a tour guide company, gave me a job as a tour operator. I worked here for nine months.

Khun Nui receives a gift of thanks from Eye

Khun Nui receives a gift of thanks from Eye

After I finished working here I was taken in by P’Nuch and moved to house near my old home. During this period I was desperately sad. I put on a brave face and told everybody I was fine, but behind closed doors I cried myself to sleep and prayed for my father to rescue me from my loneliness. Then, as if my father heard my prayers, an old friend of his helped turn things around for me again. After my father’s old friend heard of my plight he offered to take me to Bangkok to live with him. He bestowed on me the same love and kindness that my father did and he restored a lost spirit in my heart.

It was during this time I applied for a two year course in Computer and Business Management in English, at the Redemptorist Vocational School for the Disabled in Pattaya. This was the first chance I had to enter the school system on a full time basis. At first I was both excited and nervous. Excited at the prospect of learning, nervous that my disabilities would make me stand out. But soon this worry vanished as I made many friends and immersed myself in study. It felt like a second home for me. My grades were good and the life lessons I learned here as a disabled person was invaluable. Fr. Ray wished his students to become independent people and rightly proud of themselves; I thank him for this legacy, as do all of my fellow students at the school.

My world became even larger when Fr. Deang presented me with a red electric wheelchair since I just came for 3 days. It was as if I had been given a pair of wings as now I could go anywhere I wanted to on my own. Entering my last term at the school I got a job at the Postway Company and I worked in telephone marketing and advertising. It gave me the opportunity to show that a disabled person could work as well as anybody else.

My graduation day was a great success and delight for everybody. I proudly received my certificate and felt ready to take on the world. I was ready to climb all obstacles and fight for what I wanted; a good job that would allow me to support myself and a family. My next step was to begin a BA in Public Relations at Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University. I graduated in November 2008 and receive my BA on January 15, 2010 and would like to thank all who have supported me in achieving this.

After Postway Company closed down I was lucky enough to be taken on by doctor Surapol as a salesperson of Zhulian Company. I traveled around Thailand with the good doctor presenting products to consumers such as toothpaste, shampoo, vitamins, ginseng coffee, wheat grass powdered drink etc… This job was my first opportunity to really see the beautiful country of my birth, Thailand, and was a liberating experience. I always wish the doctor good fortune on his travels and thank him for showing me my country.

Today I work, thanks to Khun Anon and all the priests, at The Redemptorist Centre Pattaya. I really like my job taking reservations supervisor. I also enjoyed to take care all the group guests to come here and love spending time in the beautiful natural surroundings of the centre. Here I have finally found a peace in my life and can achieve all those things which my father wished me to achieve; independence, self-belief and hope for the future.

Things I have learned in my life; ‘Positive thinking is everything – speak only with good words – treat others as you wish to be treated – give and you will receive.’

Written and Translated by:

Miss Thanaree (Nui) Fungpinyopap

Khun Mechai – transforming education in Thailand

Khun Mechai with the RS 2010 student steering committee

Khun Mechai with the RS 2010 student steering committee

The Mechai Patana School, also known as The Bamboo School, in Buriram in the North-east of Thailand is an amazing place for learning and community engagement.  In fact Khun Mechai Viravaidya, the founder of the school, likes to refer to the school as a 7Eleven – a ‘hub’ for the community that is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 days a year.  Khun Mechai has never done things by halves and is one of the leading social entrepreneurs and innovators of education in Thailand today.  Many people knew of Khun Mechai as ‘Mr. Condom,’ the man who spoke out in the 80’s and 90’s about the imminent threat of HIV/AIDS to Thailand and travelled the country promoting the use of contraception and using his ability to use humour and wit to get the message across to the (especially rural) Thai people.  He has rightfully been recognised with numerous awards and global positions for his work on population, development and HIV/AIDS issues as you can see in his short biography below.*

Mechai Patana students who have studied at Regents over the last three years

Mechai Patana students who have studied at Regents over the last three years

Today, though, he is still working hard for the rural disadvantaged and believes education is the key factor to bringing better opportunities and equality to rural communities and the people.  The Bamboo School is a unique and holistic approach to education within a typically rote learning based Thai education system.  His model gives young rural people the chance to learn life skills and the confidence to use them to be successful in life – not just for themselves but also for their families and their communities, ultimately preventing the educated from migrating to the urban centres such as Bangkok.  The Mechai Patana students engage in service learning, work experience, social enterprise initiatives, the interviewing and recruitment of their teachers, financial responsibility, creativity, sustainable thinking and action, etc.  They really are amazing global citizens who are independent learners and succeeding academically.  Khun Mechai has recently formed a partnership with a prestigious Thai university that has recognised that the MPS students are equipped with the learning skills and values to be successful in tertiary education and beyond and has agreed to offer places to every student that graduates from the Bamboo School.

Who is teaching who?

Who is teaching who?

Khun Mechai spoke at the We Walk Together conference in October 2010 and is an inspiring speaker for young people and educators.  I strongly recommend that you visit the Bamboo School in Buriram or in Jomtien (south of Pattaya), even better invite Khun Mechai into your school or workplace – you will not be disappointed.

*Khun Mechai Viravaidya is the Founder and current Chairman of the Population and Community Development Association (PDA), one of Thailand’s largest and most successful private, non-profit, development organizations. Since 1974, PDA has initiated community- based family planning services, innovative poverty reduction programs, large-scale rural development and environmental programs, as well as groundbreaking HIV/AIDS prevention activities throughout Thailand.

Mechai Viravaidya had a pivotal role in Thailand’s hugely successful family planning program, which saw one of the most rapid fertility declines in the modern era. The rate of annual population growth in Thailand declined from over 3% in 1974 to 0.6% in 2005, and the average number of children per family fell from seven to under two. Mechai Viravaidya pioneered and championed many of Thailand’s social mobilization and community development efforts that are now taken for granted. Although much of his time was spent in the NGO sector, Mechai Viravaidya has also served in the Thai government as a Senator, in 1987 and again in 1997, and as a member of the cabinet during 1985-86 and 1991-92. As a Minister to the Office of the Prime Minister for Anand Panyarachun in 1991-92, Mechai Viravaidya was the chief architect in building Thailand’s comprehensive national HIV/AIDS prevention policy and program. This initiative is widely regarded as one of the most outstanding national efforts by any country in combating HIV/AIDS. By 2004, Thailand had experienced a 90% reduction in new HIV infections. In 2005, the World Bank reported that these preventative efforts helped save 7.7 million lives throughout the country and saved the government over US$18 billion in treatment costs alone. In recognition of his efforts Mechai Viravaidya was appointed the UNAIDS Ambassador in 1999.

Apart from his involvement in the government and the NGO sectors, Mechai Viravaidya has business and corporate experience as member of the Board of Directors and Chairman of many major corporations. He also served as trustee on the Board of many Universities and international organizations. For his efforts in various development endeavours, Mechai Viravaidya has been accorded numerous awards and recognitions including: the United Nations Gold Peace Medal (1981), the Ramon Magsaysay Award for Public Service (1994), one of Asiaweek’s “20 Great Asians” (1995), the United Nations Population Award (1997), and one of TIME Magazine’s “Asian Heroes” (2006). More recently, Mechai Viravaidya has been awarded the Nikkei Asia Prize for Regional Growth (2007). Again, PDA and Mechai Viravaidya were the recipients of the Gates Award for Global Health in 2007, and are one of the Skoll Awardees for Social Entrepreneurship in 2008, both of which are awarded with a cash gift of one million US dollars.

 

 

Peter Dalglish

In October 2010 the Round Square community of schools was privileged to be given the opening key note speech of the annual international conference by Peter Dalglish.  He is an inspiring and motivational speaker and presenter to young people and also adults.  Peter is a passionate advocate of human rights and especially those of the child and has vast experiences and many powerful examples and messages to deliver to his audience.  Peter is currently working for the United Nations in Afghanistan but is always keen to connect with schools that embrace learning through global citizenship and human rights advocacy.

Peter speaking with students from Regents International School Pattaya after a presentation

Peter speaking with students from Regents International School Pattaya after a presentation

Peter Dalglish is the founder of Street Kids International, and is a leading authority on working children, street children, and war-affected children. After graduating from Stanford and Dalhousie Law School, Peter Dalglish organized an airlift of food and medical supplies from Canada to the starving African nation. His encounter with emaciated and destitute refugees seared him for life. Peter Dalglish returned to Canada from Ethiopia and informed the senior partners of his law firm that he was giving up the profession to pursue a career alongside some of the world’s poorest children. In an isolated desert region along the Sudan’s border with Chad, Peter Dalglish organized humanitarian relief for women and children displaced by drought and famine. In Khartoum in 1986, Peter Dalglish began the Sudan’s first technical training school for street children, funded by Bob Geldof of Band Aid. Pickpockets, petty thieves and housebreakers were transformed into carpenters, welders and electricians; the graduates were hired by local businesses. In May, 1986 Peter Dalglish set up a bicycle courier service run entirely by street children in Khartoum. The kids delivered mail and newspapers to offices that they once had broken into; along the way they learned the importance of discipline and hard work. In recognition of his efforts on behalf of destitute African children, in 1988 Peter Dalglish was selected by Junior Chamber International as one of the ten outstanding young people of the world. Inspired by the tenacity and ingenuity of kids society had written off, Peter Dalglish returned to Canada in 1987 to found Street Kids International. Armed with $200, a borrowed office and an American Express card, he launched an agency that has become a global leader in designing creative self-help projects for poor, urban children. Between 1988 and 1990 Street Kids International in cooperation with the National Film Board of Canada developed Karate Kids, an animated film about HIV prevention; today the cartoon is in distribution in 25 languages and in over 100 countries, making it one of the largest initiatives for street children anywhere in the world. On account of the success of Karate Kids, in 1994 Street Kids International received the coveted Peter F. Drucker Award for Non-Profit Innovation.

Peter with Asadullah in Kabul

Peter with Asadullah in Kabul

In 1994, Peter Dalglish was appointed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau as the first director of Youth Service Canada, the Government of Canada’s civilian youth corps. In 2002 Peter Dalglish was appointed as the Chief Technical Adviser for the UN’s child labour program in Nepal. Peter Dalglish now serves as the Executive Director of the South Asia Children’s Fund, which promotes quality education for profoundly disadvantaged children in the region. He is a founding board Member of the Board of Directors of Ashoka Canada, and is the recipient of three honorary doctorate degrees, the Fellowship of Man Award, and the Dalhousie Law School Weldon Award for Public Service.