What will you achieve in 2015?

Public speaking

Public speaking

As we begin 2015 I thought it might be interesting to reflect on the the Global Citizenship Award website and to review some of the statistics so far.  I would like to thank everyone who has followed the development of the site and award over the last six months and especially to all those people who have contributed, commented and (especially) achieved their award – 9 amazing global citizens so far.  I am sure that there will be many more in 2015.

Patrick and a piano

Patrick and a piano

A London underground train holds 1,200 people. The GC Award website was viewed about 7,850 times in 2014. If it were a London underground train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.  The busiest day of the year was November 11th with 328 views.

The most popular post / blog was: One Man and a Piano.  This post was inspired by a talented young man, called Patrick, who we met at Heathrow Airport back in November.  He was playing one of those stand alone pianos and instantly caught the imagination of my two oldest kids.

A Christmas Gift

A Christmas Gift

The next four most popular posts in order were:

2. Thailand Reflections

3. The Rice Challenge – A Scottish Perspective

4.  A Christmas Gift

5.  Congratulations to Karen Partyka on achieving the Global Citizenship Award

 

Where are you reading about the GC Award?

Where are you reading about the GC Award?

 

People who have viewed the GC Award website are from 101 different countries; with the UK, Thailand, US, Australia and Brazil the top five countries that have made the most views.

The New Year has arrived and what better time than to make new targets and to challenge yourself to bigger and better things through learning and reflective practice.

Personal target setting

Personal target setting

The GC Award team would love to hear from you and will monitor and celebrate your progress as we bring new ideas and developments together through a global citizenship approach to education. Remember you can choose to submit all 16 Identities together once completed (see these Global Ambassadors for example) or submit them one at a time as individual reflections / posts (see this post by Manoj on service learning).  You can submit your post / reflection/s here.

We will always give individual constructive feedback and can guarantee that your achievements and experiences are inspiring others elsewhere around the world at the same time helping you to build a digital portfolio of personal achievement through global citizenship learning – something you will always have and use in the future.  Don’t let those amazing opportunities and experiences be wasted.  2015 is your year – go grab it!

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Congratulations to Jonah Crouch on achieving the Global Explorer Award

Learn to know, Learn to do, Learn to be, Learn to live together

Expressing the artist in you

Expressing the artist in you

 

To see Jonah’s portfolio of targets and reflections for the Global Explorer Award please click here.

 

Comment from Jonah:

I think that all 16 identities are really important and mean a lot to me. It took me quite a while and these identities are harder than they seem. 🙂

 

HillTribeProject034

Culturally aware and interactive

Congratulations Joanh on being an amazing Global Citizen.  We look forward to hearing about your progress and achievements in becoming a Global Leader.

Service learning

Service learning

 

Aware, Able, Act

Have you ever heard a tree breathe?

Have you ever heard a tree breathe?

Aware, Able, Act:  separately three simple words but together they combine to make a very powerful vision.  A school’s curriculum or learning programme (as I prefer to call it) is very similar to this concept.  We constantly use words to describe and explain all aspects of education and teaching, each one with their own relevance to specific students and their progress through school, each one seemingly important in their own right: assessment, holistic, standards, creativity, progress, leadership, independent, collaborative, the list goes on…  These words can look and sound very impressive and you will often see them on most school’s websites, in prospectuses and throughout publicity materials that promote and explain elements of a curriculum.  They mean very little though if there is nothing to bring them together, to link them like a helix that intertwines through everything a school does for its students and make learning authentic.  A really good school will have a learning programme that does this, and will be fully aware of the ‘DNA’ that brings these words and their impact on the students alive.

crushing egg shells for fertiliser

crushing egg shells for fertiliser

Aware:  All schools provide students with knowledge; it is the basis of education and the key objective to passing tests and exams ultimately gaining qualifications to (apparently?) be successful in life.  There is a lot more to life than just passing examinations therefore we want our students to be inquirers and critical thinkers to become socially and emotionally intelligent, not solely to be spoon-fed and reliant upon the passing of information, there is so much more to know, to feel and to find out.  Realistically students today can find the answer to anything without a teacher (my son is forever on Youtube watching National Geographic); the important thing is the process and how to gain the knowledge and questioning its validity.

what a learning environment!

what a learning environment!

Able:  Education is not from the neck up!  It is important to allow our students to learn in the ways that best suit them, to use all of their senses, emotions and skills, to be able to learn outside of the box.  A good test (for the students and teacher!) would be to observe a class with no teacher and to see what the students would do?  Giving children the knowledge and making them aware is important but a good programme will also ‘equip’ them, give them the tools and the confidence to use their knowledge, to be independent learners and to share it with others.

we dance together

we dance together

Act:  Too many people make the mistake of jumping straight into action.  Without real awareness and the vested time in life skills, cultural awareness and confidence building then this can be a negative experience rather than a proactive one and in the long-term this can be quite damaging in many ways.  With accurate and detailed knowledge and a confident skill set young people are empowered to make a difference, and they will.  This is not a powerful vision but a reality.

going above and beyond for learning

going above and beyond for learning

The Global Citizenship Award realizes this reality and helps young people graduate from school:  Aware, Able and Acting.  You to can also be part of this learning experience and make the most of your potential as a global citizen.  Choose an Identity, set yourself a challenging target and get reflecting – we look forward to hearing from you soon.

Congratulations to Chuliporn Mae Underwood on achieving the Global Ambassador Award

Learn to know, Learn to do, Learn to be, Learn to live together

To see Mae’s portfolio of targets and reflections for the Global Ambassador Award please click here.

sustainability

 

Comment from Mae:

Doing the award was relatively easy if done along side the CAS program offered by the International Baccalaureate. However, if I did not have to do the CAS program I would have still gone for this award, as it is a good sort of guide if you want to develop and better prepare yourself for life after high school – plus it’s an accomplishment to be proud of! Also, it took me just under two years to complete this award, although it probably should have taken one.

Mae

Mae on starting university at UC Davis:

I would also like to mention some interesting things about my university – during freshmen orientation at UC Davis, they told us that, after our first year, the extra-curricular activities we did throughout High School will no longer be significant on our CV. I found that a bit shocking but I’m excited to see what kind of opportunities I will be offered here and how it might differ from the ones I took in Thailand. I am also proud to say that UC Davis is a very environmentally-aware community. It is a sort of bike town where everyone cycles to classes and even around downtown Davis. It’s also an agricultural area so there is an abundance of organic produce. My residence hall is right next to the cows, but they say you get used to the cow smell.

Mae with YaYa and the Girl-Up group

Mae with YaYa and the Girl-Up group

Congratulations Mae on being an amazing Global Citizen.  We look forward to hearing about your progress and achievements in becoming a Global Mentor.

 

50 posts for the Global Citizenship Award

50... but not slowing down

50… but not slowing down

The Global Citizenship Award is celebrating it’s 50th post after just under 3 months of existence.  Thank you to everyone that has followed the growth of the online award and platform for celebrating personal growth and achievement through the 16 Identities of global citizenship and UNESCO’s Four Pillars of Education.

GC Award in numbers so far:

3500 hits, 7 GC Award achievers, 7 females*, 2 Global Mentors, 4 Global Ambassadors, 1 Global Catalyst, 6 different countries (see the world map here), 2 alumni assessor and contributors**, 2 academic assessors and contributors

 *The GC Award team is looking forward to the first submission from a male (Jonah, aged 7, is close to achieving his Global Explorer Award, see here, will anyone beat him?).

**The GC Award team would like to welcome Katrin Puutsa to the team as our second alumni assessor and contributor (see the GC Award team here – we are always looking for new members).

Straight ahead for global citizenship

Straight ahead for global citizenship

Why should you do the GC Award:

1. To track your personal growth and achievements across a broad and diverse set of learning experiences

2. To develop a digital portfolio / record of achievement that can be used for future interviews and applications (see an example here)

3. To set personal targets and to become a reflective person seeking continuous improvement (lifelong learner)

4. To realise that learning is dynamic and that the skills, values and attitudes you develop are transferable and help you to become successful in life

5. To share amazing learning experiences and provide ideas and opportunities for collaboration (once you have achieved the award you can contribute to the website at anytime and build an online profile)

6. To embrace being a citizen of the Earth and everything that we can learn from it

7. It is a challenge and to achieve the certificate!

8. We always give constructive feedback and are happy to help anyone that is looking to learn through global citizenship

Reflection is what links our performance to our potential

Reflection is what links our performance to our potential

How to achieve the award and contribute to the site:

There are 2 ways to achieve the award (there are 7 awards depending upon your age and you can work through them all):

1. Keep a personal diary or portfolio of your experiences, targets and achievements across the 16 Identities.  When you have completed them all (they must be challenging) submit your portfolio here for assessment.

2. Choose one Identity at a time and set a target that will challenge you – ‘take you out of your comfort zone’.  Record the experience through a reflective process, preferably in a digital format – include some photos or video, etc.  Then submit the post for that one Identity here.  You can then choose your second Identity and so on…  We will record your progress through the website and inform you when you have achieved the relevant GC Award. We will also help you present all 16 of your Identities in a smart digital format on completion.

The original 16 Identities of the GC Award

The original 16 Identities of the GC Award

NB: The GC Award team do not claim that the original 16 Identities are the only ones that distinguish a global citizen – there are many more.  We are more than happy for you to choose alternative Identities that fit under each of the Four Pillars of Education and as long as you have completed 16 in total.

Some of our favourite posts so far:

Baking for global citizenship

World War One – a personal reflection

Finding the leader in you

From Ice to Rice

Remember you can read the posts of your favourite GC Award team members and GC Award achievers here

You can follow the Global Citizenship Award by signing up to follow this blog at the top right on the home page.  You can also follow the award on Twitter @pauljcrouch or on Facebook.

 

Congratulations to Katrin Puutsa on achieving the Global Mentor Award

Learn to know, Learn to do, Learn to be, Learn to live together

To see Katrin’s portfolio of targets and reflections for the Global Mentor Award please click here.

Kati on the Baan Maelid project in Thailand

Kati on the Baan Maelid project in Thailand

Comment from Katrin:

Completing the award was an ongoing process for me, which started possibly back when I was in primary school. I have been fortunate enough to attend schools and work for organisations with vasts amount of opportunities to get involved with activities and projects to work towards the award. On the journey I’ve also been lucky to meet inspiring people and realise the journey never really ends, as when you grow your network and step out of your comfort zone, new and exciting opportunities arise, you just need the courage to grab them, learn and grow from them!

Kati, always up for the challenge!

Kati, always up for the challenge!

Congratulations Katrin on being an amazing Global Citizen.  We look forward to reading your contributions to the Global Citizenship Award website and continuing to be a global mentor to young people and anyone that you meet.

 Assessed by: Paul Crouch, Brittany Tang and Sarah Travis-Mulford

Congratulations to Karen Partyka on achieving the Global Mentor Award

Learn to know, Learn to do, Learn to be, Learn to live together

To see Karen’s portfolio of targets and reflections for the Global Mentor Award please see here.

Karen participating in the World Clean-up challenge and with a Camillian Centre child

Karen participating in the World Clean-up challenge and with a Camillian Centre child

Comment from Karen:

The award was very beneficial and got me thinking about the world.

Karen on a Round Square project in South Africa

Karen on a Round Square project in South Africa

Congratulations Karen on being an amazing Global Citizen.  We look forward to reading your contributions to the Global Citizenship Award website and continuing to be a global mentor to young people and anyone that you meet.

 Assessed by: Paul Crouch, Brittany Tang and Sarah Travis-Mulford

Karen with Julianne in Thailand

Karen with Julianne in Thailand